Department of ClassicsUniversity of Cincinnati
Department of Classics

CLAS1001 Greek Civilization

A survey of the literature, material culture, and intellectual thought of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period. The course will provide a chronological framework for the analysis of Greek culture through its literature, art and architecture, and system of values and beliefs. Emphasis will be placed on the debt that modern culture owes to the ancient Greeks and the fundamental differences that separate us from the ancient world. Students will be asked to analyze and think critically about ancient objects and texts.

CLAS1002 Roman Civilization

A survey of the literature, material culture, and intellectual thought of Roman civilization from the founding of Rome through the imperial period. The course will provide a chronological framework for the analysis of Roman culture through its literature, art and architecture, and system of values and beliefs. Emphasis will be placed on the debt that modern culture owes to the ancient Romans and the fundamental differences that separate us from the ancient world. Students will be asked to analyze and think critically about ancient objects and texts.

CLAS1003 Freshmen Seminar

The Freshman Seminar in Classical Civilization course is designed to introduce first-year students to key topics of the Greek and Roman world in an engaging, yet rigorous manner. The focus of the topics will change from year to year. Enrollment is limited to a small number of students. Instruction is based on the seminar format, emphasizing discussion and direct student-professor interaction. The course is part of the university's First Year Experience program.

CLAS1011 Greek History

Survey of Greek history from the Bronze Age to the Roman conquest. The course will focus on the political, social, and economic history of Greece and the Greek settlements around the Mediterranean, from the rise of Sparta in the archaic period and of Athens in the classical period to the extraordinary exploits of Alexander the Great that took the Greeks as far east as India in the Hellenistic period.

CLAS1012 Roman History

Survey of Roman history from the origins of the Roman state in the Iron Age until the mid-fourth century CE. The course will focus on the political, social, and economic history of Rome in its development from an Italian community into an empire that included the entire Mediterranean world and much beyond.

CLAS1015 Egyptian History

Introductory survey of the history of ancient Egypt from the Predynastic to the Late Period and beyond. Highlighted periods include the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms and the roles of Egypt in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire.

CLAS1021 Mythology

A survey of the mythology of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Topics addressed will include stories of the creation and genealogy of the gods, the nature of the Olympian deities and the principal accounts of their interaction with humans, stories of the heroes and heroines, and the Roman adaptation of the Greek pantheon and heroic narratives. The literary and visual evidence for the myths will be analyzed as reflections of ancient cult, cultural values, and concerns; modern interpretations of myths will be analyzed for the multiplicity of approaches to understanding myths and their meaning.

CLAS1022 Ancient Magic

This course investigates magical practices and beliefs in four different cultures: Ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome, and the world of the Celts. Sources discussed include archaeological remains and textual evidence such as the Pyramid Texts, magical papyri, curse tablets, and tales of magic and sorcery.

CLAS2001 Ancient Sports

Historical overview of ancient Greek and Roman sports and entertainment from the foundation of the Olympic Games (776 BCE) to Late Antiquity. The focus will be on the distinctive characteristics of Greek sports and Roman entertainment. Subjects include: Greek athletics and other forms of entertainment, shaping local and generic "Greek" identity; Roman combat sports, shaping Roman and generic "imperial" identity; the "venues" where all this took place; amateurism versus professionalism; the demise of Greek athletics and Roman combat sports in Late Antiquity.

CLAS2011 Classics in Film

The course investigates the use of classical themes in modern cinematography. Its focal point is the artistic appropriation of classical themes in service of a fresh literary and cinematic vision. Films with classical themes are viewed as a part of the process of creative imitation and reinvention of "a classic." Each segment of the course is based on interpretation of a classical text; this experience is then used to shed light on cinematic adaptations of classical texts and themes for our age. Reading assignments may include selections from Greek and Roman epic, tragedy, historiography, lyric poetry, philosophy, and novel. Each reading is connected with a film. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and writing assignments based on critical appraisal of the texts and films.

CLAS2012 Pompeii

The eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in AD 79 completely buried the Roman city of Pompeii. We will rediscover Pompeii's temples, theaters, baths, streets, and her many houses, humble and haughty, to understand the development and operation of this ancient city. The course includes surveys of nearby archaeological sites to help contextualize Pompeii within its regional and cultural landscape.  Material and information will also be drawn from the UC Classics Department's excavations at Pompeii.

CLAS2013 Daily Life in Ancient Greece

This course will explore ancient Greek society (900-300 BCE) and culture though a perspective that focuses on the everyday life of a pre-industrial society: public and private life, male vs. female roles, city life vs. countryside, the life of citizens, non-citizens, and slaves, religion, festivals, and sports, education, burial customs, clothes, and personal objects, food and drink, cooking and dining, and farming and pastoralism. The course will include a discussion and evaluation of modern views of what ancient Greek life was with particular reference to perspectives gained through 20th century films.

CLAS2014 The Etruscans

The "mysterious" Etruscans were an advanced people who dominated northern Italy from the tenth to the first centuries BCE. They spoke a language unrelated to any other. Though often compared with the Greeks (whose goods they imported) and the Romans (who adopted their religious practices), they had a unique culture that included fortified cities, elaborate tombs, wide-ranging trade, incomparable metalwork, and unusual practices (like dining with women, or divining the future from animal livers) that made them the talk of the ancient world. This course will survey Etruscan civilization from its origins to its absorption by Rome in the first century BCE.

CLAS2021 Egyptian Art and Archaeology

This is a survey of ancient Egyptian culture through the study of its history, religion, society, art, literature, scripts, and the private life and death of the ancient Egyptians. We will learn how the pyramids were built and see how temples, sculptures and wall paintings were created. We will also review how the Egyptian culture was discovered and examine its impact on later cultures including the Greek, Roman, and European. We will meet looters, travelers, journalists, and scholars and compare changing attitudes toward Egyptian culture.

CLAS2022 Greek Art and Archaeology

An introduction to the material culture of ancient Greece using archaeological evidence: from the Neolithic and Bronze Age through the Classical Greek period (7000-300 BCE). The art and architecture of ancient Greece has inspired nearly every subsequent Western culture; we will therefore investigate the significance of the Greek tradition and evaluate, assess, and compare the meaning of its impact on contemporary culture.

CLAS2023 Roman Art and Archaeology

A survey of ancient Roman culture (circa 800 BC - AD 400) through a study of its history, art, and architecture. Topics include the development of the Roman empire, urban and rural communities, changes in customs and lifestyles over time and place, and the ways by which archaeologists and historians interpret the physical remains of Roman life.

CLAS2024 Archaeology of Myth

This course examines ancient Greek myths that are directly associated with some of the most famous archaeological sites in the ancient Greek world, including several places where UC classics faculty has excavated (Troy, Pylos, and Knossos). The course will juxtapose the archaeology of key sites in the Bronze Age Aegean (3000-1100 BCE) and the mythological stories of heroes and heroines associated with these sites: Troy and the Trojan War; Mycenae and the mask of Agamemnon; Pylos and the palace of Nestor; Knossos and king Minos; Thebes and Oedipus; and Thera and Atlantis. The birth and development of prehistoric archaeology will be explained with reference to these sites. The literary (Homer's Iliad and Odyssey) and artistic evidence for the myths will also be analyzed as reflections of past societies. Modern interpretations and myth reception will also be part of the reflection that takes place in the course.

CLAS2031 Medical Terminology

Introduction to the Greek and Latin elements such as roots, prefixes, and suffixes that are used in modern medical terminology. About 1,000 key medical terms will be analyzed, all in common use in medicine, nursing, dentistry, microbiology, psychology, and medical technology.

CLAS2032 Celtic and Norse Mythology

Celtic and Norse myth and religion are presented through readings of primary sources, interpretations of artistic representations, and discussion of modern evaluations. Modern theories about the social and cultural significance of myth and its place in the religious system of a given civilization are also introduced.

CLAS2033 Egyptian and Mesopotamian Mythology

Ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian myth and religion are presented through primary readings of ancient texts, interpretations of artistic depictions and archaeological evidence, and discussion of modern evaluations. There will be a special focus on the archaeology of ancient religious sites and temples in Egypt and Mesopotamia. Modern theories about the significance of myth within a given religious system will also be introduced.

CLAS3001 Ancient Warfare

A survey of warfare in Greece and Rome from its origins until the fourth century CE. The course will concentrate on the sources for ancient military history and how to use them to reconstruct Greek and Roman warfare. Topics such as strategy, tactics, battle experience, and the effects of war on society are also included.

CLAS3002 Ancient Religion

Historical overview of ancient Greek and Roman religion from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity. The focus will be on the distinctive characteristics of Greek religion and its myths and Roman religion and its rituals, but also on common characteristics such as gods and temples. Subjects include: the absence or presence of religious professionals; state religion versus private religiosity; the philosophical underpinning or undermining of religion; the interaction of paganism with Judaism and Christianity and the transformation of ancient religious ideas and practices in Late Antiquity.

CLAS3011 Bronze Age Palaces

This course examines the emergence, development, and collapse of complex societies in Crete and Mainland Greece (2000-1200 BCE) based on archaeological evidence. This course puts special emphasis on discussing material culture in context: the design, uses, and meaning of artifacts (and ecofacts) produced, distributed, and consumed in the Aegean region of the East Mediterranean during the Bronze Age (3000-1200 BCE).

CLAS3012 Athenian Acropolis

This course is an intensive exploration of the most important religious site of ancient Athens from the Neolithic period to the modern period. We will use archaeological, epigraphic, and literary evidence to explore ancient Greek religious practice, art and architecture, and the Acropolis's historical significance in antiquity and today. Divergent theories, interpretations, and ethical debates within the field of archaeology will be presented.

CLAS3013 Roman Cities

This course is an intensive survey of the fabulously rich archaeological remains of various Roman cities from across the Roman world. We will use archaeological, epigraphic, and literary evidence to explore topics such as the development of Rome and Roman colonies; urban planning and zoning; domestic, commercial, industrial, and religious activities; entertainment, spectacle, and art in the urban sphere; and death and burial.

CLAS3021 Ancient Sex

An exploration of the sex and gender systems of Greece and Rome. This class demands a greater degree of involvement and participation than an introductory course. The primary methods of instruction are guided readings in primary and secondary sources, lectures, student presentations, and a variety of visual materials. CLAS 1001 and 1002 are recommended as a foundation for this course.

CLAS3022 Ancient Philosophers

A thematic and chronological overview of the broad movements in ancient thought, from the distinction of reason from myth in archaic Greece to the differentiation of the three main areas of Hellenistic and Roman philosophy: physics, logic, and ethics. Detailed study of selected thinkers (such as Heraclitus, Protagoras, Aristotle, Epicurus, Cicero, and Marcus Aurelius), and of what is known of their lives and motivations, within these traditions. Primary readings will be from Greek and Roman literature in English translation. Emphasis will be placed on the intellectual innovations of the Greeks and Romans in their historical situations, both those that were formative for western history and those that did not survive the end of classical antiquity.

CLAS3031 History of Medicine

A history of the western medical tradition from ancient Egypt to the modern age, with an emphasis on the relation of medicine to society. Topics include definitions of disease; theories of the body, society, and the cosmos; images of the normal and abnormal; analogical thinking, model making, paradigm breaking; the roles of curers; the experiences of patients. The primary methods of instruction are guided readings in primary and secondary sources, lectures, and the use of visual materials.

CLAS4001 Bread and Butter

Historical overview of food and food production in ancient Greece and Rome from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity. The focus will be on food as sustenance and symbol. Subjects include: the "Mediterranean triad" (grain, wine, oil); eating in versus eating out; the distinctive characteristics of Greek and Italian agriculture; the role of public and private consumption in shaping Greek identity (male citizens versus women, foreigners, and slaves); the role of food in public religion and sacrifice; the food supply of the city of Rome; the role of food in shaping Roman identity in the provinces (pork and wine versus beer).

CLAS4002 Nuts and Bolts

Historical overview of technology in ancient Greece and Rome from the Archaic Period to Late Antiquity. The focus will be on technologies as practical skills and as social constructs. Subjects include: the definition of technology in ancient Greek and Latin ("techne" and "ars" include art); surviving "technical" handbooks in Greek and Latin on such "technologies" as agriculture, architecture, law, medicine, and rhetoric; the development of Greek writing as a technology; Greek pottery and metal working in the Classical period; the view of such "banausic arts" among contemporary Greek philosophers; military technology in the Hellenistic period; Roman land surveying and hydraulic engineering; the social status of craftsmen, engineers, and architects in the Roman world; the role of women and slavery in ancient production; technological progress and its limits in Antiquity; and the role of technology in the ancient economy.

CLAS4003 Warp and Weft

This course introduces students to textile production and consumption in ancient Greece and Rome. A broad historical survey traces technological innovation over time and illustrates changes in the way textiles help build identity ("clothes make the man"). Archaeological and textual sources are available: textiles preserved from antiquity and iconographical representations for the former, and literature and documents about textile production, trade, and use for the latter. There will be a special focus on social, economic, and gender aspects of textile production, trade, and use. How important was textile production to the ancient economy, how did this change over time, and how does this compare to the medieval and early modern successors of antiquity?

CLAS4011 Ancient Rhetoric

This course traces the development of ancient literary and rhetorical theory through reading and analysis of major Greek and Roman texts in translation, such as Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Poetics and Rhetoric, Cicero's rhetorical works, and Horace's Art of Poetry. From their early ideas about the uses and effects of poetry and public speech, the Greeks developed sophisticated theories of literature and rhetoric that were adapted by the Romans and became foundational for modern critical thinking about these subjects.  Students will discuss ancient thought and controversy about the uses of literary and rhetorical speech in society, its connection to the formation of ethical behavior, and the value of critical judgment about it, and will analyze theoretical texts and apply the ideas in them to surviving works of ancient literature.

CLAS4012 Roman Law

Introduction to Roman law through the discussion of "cases" preserved in Latin and presented in English translation. The "cases" include striking parallels and contrasts to Anglo-American law. The discussion will introduce students to the way lawyers think: when discussing "cases," lawyers take their cue from texts, which can be laws but also precedents, i.e. older "cases." Roman legal texts are unique not only because they are the most numerous such texts to survive from Antiquity, but also because they are the basis for later historical, and in some cases contemporary, legal systems. Generally speaking the "cases" will relate to Roman family law and the Roman law of delict. As a bonus, students will be introduced to a variety of aspects of ancient Roman life through texts they do not normally read in courses focused on Latin literature.

CLAS4031 The Age of Augustus

Augustus changed Rome from an oligarchic republic to an imperial monarchy, but he is also seen as having had an enormous effect on the literature, architecture, and other arts of his time. This course will assemble and examine the original archaeological, literary, and historical sources (in translation) as well as the topographical evidence from the city of Rome itself to determine what Augustus did to change Rome both physically and politically and evaluate his influence on the arts and monuments of his age.

CLAS5001 Capstone

Capstone experience for Classics and Classical Civilization majors. The focus will be on the accomplishment of a substantial research project on a subject of the student's choosing, under the supervision of a faculty member. The course includes: a systematic introduction to the ways in which scholars of the ancient world tackle a particular problem; a critical evaluation of the relevant evidence; the construction of a research paper outline; a critique of a preliminary draft; the writing of a final paper which presents the results of the student's individual research project.

CLAS7001 Greek History

This course focuses on the primary sources for some of the major events in Greek history from the archaic period to the Hellenistic period. Students will read and analyze English translations of ancient Greek literature and inscriptions. They will then immerse themselves in the historical problems raised by these sources and addressed in secondary literature.

CLAS7002 Roman History

This course covers the main problems in Roman history between the origins of Rome and the end of the second century CE and introduces students to the relevant historical methodologies. These include: the formation of the Republic, the senatorial oligarchy, the role of the citizen in the political process, the expansion of Rome in Italy and then throughout the Mediterranean and beyond, Rome's relation with her Italian allies, the fall of the Republic and the establishment of the Principate, and the development of imperial administration in the provinces.

CLAS7003 Jewish and Christian History

This course covers the main problems in Jewish and Christian history and literature from the Hellenistic period to the end of the fourth century CE and introduces students to the relevant historical and literary methodologies. These problems include: the Hellenization of Jews in the diaspora, the Septuagint, the troublesome relations between the Jewish communities and the Roman authorities, the works of Philo and Josephus, the origins of Christianity, the composition of the New Testament, the early church, its organization and doctrines, the persecutions from Nero to the tetrachs, the parting of the ways between Judaism and Christianity, early Greek and Latin church fathers, the development of normative and authoritarian Christianity after Constantine, and the later Greek and Latin church fathers.

CLAS7005 Greek Documents

Reading course on ancient Greek documents preserved on stone. The texts include Athenian decrees of the fifth and fourth century BCE (e.g. the tribute quota lists of the Athenian empire and building accounts for the great Periclean monuments) and examples of royal correspondence between Hellenistic Greek kings and various Greek cities.

CLAS7006 Greek Papyri

Introduction to the study of Greek papyrus texts from the third century BCE to Late Antiquity. The focus will be on the palaeography of papyrus texts over time and their use as historical evidence for the Hellenistic and Roman world. Subjects include: ancient manuscript evidence for known and unknown Greek literary works; non-literary, standard Greek; public and private documents; the range of legal instruments; the economy and society of Graeco-Roman Egypt; ancient people underrepresented in other sources (women, the rural population, provincials generally).

CLAS7007 Latin Documents

Introduction to the study of Latin inscriptions from the second century BCE to Late Antiquity. The focus will be on the palaeography of inscriptions over time and their use as historical evidence for Italy in the time of the Republic, for the early Empire, and for Roman "provincial" culture. Subjects include: epigrams and other poems; non-literary, "vulgar" Latin; the range of public and private documents; the distinct "epigraphies" in Roman provinces or even within Italy; the society of small towns as opposed to Rome; ancient people underrepresented in other sources (freedmen, common soldiers, provincials generally).

CLAS7011 Prehistory 1

This is the firstpart of a two-part intensive survey of the prehistoric culture in the Greek world (the Aegean and Cyprus). During the course we will review theoretical and methodological approaches to Greek, Minoan, or Cypriot archaeology from the Palaeolithic period to the Middle Bronze Age.

CLAS7012 Prehistory 2

This is the second part of a two-part intensive survey of the prehistoric culture in the Greek world (the Aegean and Cyprus). This survey will cover the Late Bronze Age, the most flourishing prehistoric period in the Aegean. The emergence of the great Bronze Age palaces in Crete, the Mycenaean citadels in the Greek mainland, and economic centers in Cyprus will be studied. Economy, administration, religion, and society will be examined in the light of Linear B (the most ancient Greek) texts and the remains of the material culture. The development of trade and far-reaching foreign relations will be analyzed. We will study the art of the period (wall-painting, ceramics and seals) and identify changes and innovations. Previous and recent theories concerning relations between the Mycenaean states, Crete, and Cyprus will be critiqued and evaluated and the chronological framework for the period (critical for the reconstruction of the history) will be assessed.

CLAS7013 Greek Archaeology 1

The first of a two-part intensive survey of the material culture of the Ancient Greek world in the Iron Age and Archaic periods (ca. 1000-480 BC). The course will examine the archaeological evidence for civic, sacred, and domestic activities and will consider the development of architectural, sculptural, and ceramic forms throughout the period in order to understand how material culture both reflects and shapes cultural identity. Various methodological approaches and theoretical models will be introduced.

CLAS7014 Greek Archaeology 2

The second of a two-part intensive survey of the material culture of the Ancient Greek world in the Classical and Hellenistic periods (ca. 480-31 BC). The course will examine the archaeological evidence for civic, sacred, and domestic activities and will consider the development of architectural, sculptural, and ceramic forms throughout the period in order to understand how material culture both reflects and shapes cultural identity. Special attention will be paid to the definition of "Classical" Greek culture and its re-definition in the Hellenistic period. Various methodological approaches and theoretical models will be introduced.

CLAS7015 Roman Archaeology 1

This is the first of a two-part intensive survey of the material culture of the Roman world, with a focus on the first millennium BC.   We will examine the various archaeological approaches taken to topics such as the foundation and early development of Rome in the regal period; the identities of, and cultural exchanges between, the Villanovans, Etruscans, Samnites, Romans, and other Italic groups; the Roman conquest of Italy and the Mediterranean during the Republican period; and the methodological and theoretical frameworks within which Roman archaeologists have examined the art and archaeology of the first millennium BC.

CLAS7016 Roman Archaeology 2

This is the second of a two-part intensive survey of the material culture of the Roman world, with an historical focus on the first 500 years AD. We will examine the various archaeological approaches taken to topics such as the creation of an Empire; the identities of, and cultural exchanges between, the Romans and their conquered nations; life in the Roman provinces; the collapse of an empire; the rise of Christianity; and the methodological and theoretical frameworks within which Roman archaeologists have examined the art and archaeology of the first half of the first millennium AD.

CLAS7021 Historical Linguistics

Study of the linguistic nature and development of Greek and Latin. The methodology of historical linguistics is to analyze the phonology and morphology of Greek and Latin in comparison with other Indo-European languages, especially Sanskrit, in order to understand the patterns of linguistic change that produced the received forms of the languages. This course requires a graduate-level knowledge of Greek and Latin.

CLAS7022 Literary Theory

A survey of modern literary theories as they pertain to the interpretation of Greek and Latin texts. The theoretical approaches covered will include such categories as American new criticism; French structuralism, semiotics, and poststructuralism; psychoanalytic interpretation; Marxism, feminism, gender studies, and postcolonialism; Russian formulism, reader-response criticism, and narratology; new historicism and cultural studies. The course requires intensive reading in modern theoretical texts, oral and written discussion and analysis of these texts, and oral and written application to ancient authors. A graduate-level capacity in Greek and/or Latin texts is required.

CLAS7031 IT for Archaeologists

This course prepares students to use computers and information technologies effectively in archaeological research, including database design and integration with spatial data through GIS.

CLAS7032 Archaeological Theory

This course prepares students to effectively engage in theoretical and methodological approaches to archaeological research.  We will examine the histories of theory and method in archaeology, outline the contributions that these approaches have made to the discipline, and apply a range of them to various case studies across Prehistoric, Greek, and Roman archaeology.

CLAS8005 Directed Readings

Reading under the supervision of a faculty member of primary sources and secondary literature on an area of historical, archaeological, or philological study not covered in a regularly scheduled course that the student could take instead but essential to the progress of the student.

CLAS8006 MA Thesis

M.A. thesis writing under the supervision of one or more faculty members. The focus will be on producing a defendable MA thesis. Subjects include: formulating a topic; researching primary and secondary source material; producing an outline; writing chapters and revising them; finalizing the typescript.

CLAS8007 PHD Dissertation

PhD dissertation research and writing under the supervision of one or more faculty members. The focus will be on producing a defendable PhD dissertation in the last semester 15CLAS8007 is taken. Subjects include: formulating a topic and an original working hypothesis; researching primary and secondary source material; producing an outline; writing chapters and revising them; supporting original conclusions with new or newly interpreted evidence; finalizing the typescript in the last semester 15CLAS8007 is taken.

CLAS9001 History Seminar

Each ancient history seminar focuses on a key period and/or region of the ancient Greek and Roman world. Students write short reports (e.g. reviews of recently published secondary literature dealing with the subject of the seminar) as well as a final paper. The latter, usually 20-25 pages long, is an in-depth investigation of a topic that is of particular interest to the student.

CLAS9011 Prehistory Seminar

This is an intensive seminar on Aegean Prehistory. Topics will change every year, but will relate to past and current theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of Aegean Prehistory from 7000 until 700 BCE.  Emphasis will be given to new data and analysis of current themes in Aegean Prehistory.

CLAS9012 Greek Archaeology Seminar

An intensive seminar on a topic of Greek Archaeology from the period of ca. 1000-31 BC. The focus will change every year, but each seminar will examine a topic of Greek material culture in depth in order to understand how it relates to Greek cultural definition. Various theoretical and methodological approaches will be presented.

CLAS9013 Roman Archaeology Seminar

This course is an intensive seminar on Roman Archaeology. The topical focus will change each year, but will always relate to contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to Roman material culture from approximately 1000 BC until 500 AD.

CLAS9014 Diachronic Archaeology Seminar

This is a series of advanced graduate seminars (with topics changing from year to year) which focus on a single theoretically informed topic in the archaeology of the Mediterranean to discuss, analyze, critique, and debate its application to spatially and temporally diverse case studies. The seminars are intentionally designed to go beyond the disciplinary boundaries of Prehistoric, Greek, and Roman archaeology. Seminars will often be team-taught.

GRK1001 Intensive 1

A beginning course in the ancient Greek language, directed toward the reading of ancient Greek texts. Completion of the sequence fulfills various college language requirements.  Students should confirm the language requirement with their home college.

GRK1002 Intensive 2

Continuation of the beginning course in the ancient Greek language, leading to the reading of ancient Greek texts. This course prepares students to enter Attic Prose (GRK 3001) where continuous texts of such authors as Plato will be read and translated.  Completion of sequence fulfills various college language requirements.  Students should confirm the language requirement with their home college.

GRK3001 Attic Prose

A first reading course after completion of intensive elementary Greek. The course consists of a brief review of the paradigms of Greek verbal and nominal forms, more extensive review and development of knowledge of syntax, composition of Greek sentences, and reading of one or more texts in the original Greek prose, such as Plato's Apology.

GRK3002 Homer, Iliad

An introduction to the epic poetry of Homer through a reading of selections from the Iliad.

GRK4001 Philosophy

An advanced reading course in Greek philosophical texts, such as Plato's Symposium. The course assumes previous reading of a continuous Greek prose text and advanced knowledge of the forms, vocabulary, and syntax found in such a text. Students will gain familiarity with secondary scholarship on Greek philosophy and ancient philosophical literature through such tasks as reporting on articles and books and writing short papers.

GRK4002 Tragedy

A first reading course in ancient Greek tragedy, typically Euripides. The course assumes some previous reading of Attic prose and epic poetry, as well as advanced knowledge of Greek forms, vocabulary, and syntax. Students will gain familiarity with secondary scholarship on tragedy through such tasks as reporting on articles and books and writing short papers.

GRK4003 Herodotus

An advanced reading course in the historian Herodotus. The course assumes previous reading of a continuous Greek prose text and advanced knowledge of the forms, vocabulary, and syntax found in such a text. Students will gain familiarity with secondary scholarship on Herodotus and the development of historical writing through such tasks as reporting on articles and books and writing short papers.

GRK4004 Advanced Epic

An advanced reading course in early epic texts, such as Homer's Odyssey, Hesiod, and the Homeric Hymns. The course assumes previous reading of Homer and knowledge of the forms, vocabulary, and metrical practices found in Greek epic. Students will gain familiarity with secondary scholarship on Greek epic through such tasks as reporting on articles and books and writing short papers.

GRK5001 Capstone

Capstone experience for Classics majors who wish to work on a special topic involving ancient Greek language and literature.  The course will be directed toward the completion of a paper on a subject chosen by the student and accepted by the faculty supervisor for the course. The course includes: a systematic introduction to the ways in which scholars of Greek language and literature develop research and/or interpretive topics; a critical evaluation of the relevant texts and select secondary literature; an introduction to methods of citing scholarship and constructing a bibliography; the construction of a paper outline; a critique of a first draft; a final paper.

GRK6001 Tragedy 1

Reading of three of the earlier Greek tragedies, typically the plays of both Aeschylus and Sophocles. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the literary issues connected with Attic tragedy. Students are expected to consult standard commentaries on a regular basis and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6002 Philosophy

Reading of major works of Greek philosophical prose, such as Plato or Aristotle, typically about ten OCT pages a week.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations and discussion of the literary and philosophical issues raised by the texts read. Students are expected to consult standard commentaries on a regular basis and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6003 Lyric etc.

Reading of selections from early Greek lyric, elegiac, and iambic poetry, such the selections in Campbell and some Pindar.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the literary issues connected with archaic Greek poetry.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries on a regular basis and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6004 Attic Orators

Reading of one or more of the Attic orators, typically about ten OCT pages a week.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with Greek oratory in its historical and literary setting.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6005 Tragedy 2

Reading of three of the later Greek tragedies, typically plays of both Sophocles and Euripides. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the literary issues connected with Attic tragedy. Students are expected to read standard commentaries and some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6006 Thucydides

Reading of approximately two books of Thucydides.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of Thucydides' literary style and the issues connected with his writings in their historical, literary, and intellectual setting.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6007 Comedy

Reading of three comedies by Aristophanes, or Aristophanes and Menander. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the literary and social issues connected with Attic comedy. Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK6008 Hellenistic Poetry

Reading of a selection of Hellenistic poetry, with a focus on major poets such as Callimachus, Theocritus, and Apollonius of Rhodes. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the literary and aesthetic issues connected with Hellenistic literature. Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

GRK7011 Prose Composition

This course advances knowledge of ancient Greek prose through composition of complex sentences and paragraphs.  It includes study of the historical development of prose style through analysis of exemplary passages from prose authors.

GRK8001 Remedial

This course offers intermediate study to those students entering the graduate program who require additional preparation in Greek before undertaking graduate-level work.  It is designed to improve a student's knowledge of the Greek language and develop facility in translation, in preparation for entrance into 6000-level Greek courses.  This course does not count toward the graduate requirements in Greek.

GRK8005 Directed Readings

Directed readings offer a student the opportunity to engage in self-directed work in Greek, resulting in examination by a supervising faculty member.  Permission of the graduate advisor is required.

GRK9001 Seminar

The seminar prepares students to become research scholars in topics involving Greek language and literature.  It typically includes intensive reading of Greek texts from one author or genre or on a single subject, substantial reading in secondary sources, participation in discussion of ancient texts and modern interpretation of them, and development of oral reports and research papers.

LATN1001 Intensive 1

Accelerated introduction to Latin grammar and reading. The first in a two-part course sequence.  Completion of the sequence fulfills various college language requirements.  Students should confirm the language requirement with their home college.

LATN1002 Intensive 2

Accelerated introduction to Latin grammar and reading. The second in a two-part course sequence. Completion of the sequence fulfills various college language requirements.  Students should confirm the language requirement with their home college.

LATN1011 Elementary 1

An introduction to Latin grammar and the reading of simple prose. The first in a two-part course sequence.  Completion of LATN 1011, 1012 and LATN 2011, 2012 fulfills various college language requirements. Students should confirm the language requirement with their home college.

LATN1012 Elementary 2

An introduction to Latin grammar and the reading of simple prose and poetry. The second in a two-part course sequence.  Completion of LATN 1011, 1012 and LATN 2011, 2012 fulfills various college language requirements. Students should confirm the language requirement with their home college.

LATN1014 AP Credit

College credit for students who have received a 4 or a 5 on the AP Latin (Vergil) examination.

LATN2011 Intermediate 1

Intensive review of basic Latin combined with selected readings in prose and poetry. The first in a two-part course sequence. Completion of LATN 1011, 1012 and LATN 2011, 2012 fulfills various college language requirements. Students should confirm the language requirement with their home college.

LATN2012 Intermediate 2

Intensive review of basic Latin combined with selected readings in poetry and prose. The second in a two-part course sequence. Completion of LATN 1011, 1012 and LATN 2011, 2012 fulfills various college language requirements. Students should confirm the language requirement with their home college.

LATN3001 Prose

A first reading course after completion of elementary LATN 1002 or intermediate LATN 2012.  The course consists of an introduction to advanced Latin syntax, composition of Latin sentences, and reading of one or more texts of Latin prose, such as Cicero or Caesar.

LATN3002 Vergil, Aeneid

An introduction to the epic poetry of Vergil through a reading of selections from the Aeneid.

LATN4001 Historians

An advanced reading course in one or more of the major Roman historians, such as Livy or Sallust. The course assumes previous reading of a continuous Latin prose text and advanced knowledge of the forms, vocabulary, and syntax found in such a text. Students will gain familiarity with secondary scholarship on Roman historians and with the development of historical writing through such tasks as reporting on articles and books and writing short papers.

LATN4002 Lyric

A reading course in Latin lyric poetry of Catullus and Horace. The course assumes some previous reading of Latin prose and poetry, as well as advanced knowledge of forms, vocabulary, and syntax. Students will gain familiarity with secondary scholarship on lyric poetry through such tasks as reporting on articles and books and writing short papers.

LATN4003 Epistolography

An advanced reading course in Latin epistles, including the letters of Cicero, Seneca, and Pliny.  The course assumes previous reading of continuous Latin prose text and advanced knowledge of the forms, vocabulary, and syntax found in such a text.  Students will gain familiarity with secondary scholarship on the Latin authors read and the ancient genre of epistolography through such tasks as reporting on articles and books and writing short papers.

LATN4004 Elegiac

A reading course in the elegy of Propertius, Tibullus, Sulpicia, and Ovid.  The course assumes some previous reading of Latin prose and poetry, as well as advanced knowledge of forms, vocabulary, and syntax.  Students will gain familiarity with secondary scholarship on elegiac poetry through such tasks as reporting on articles and books and writing short papers.

LATN5001 Capstone

Capstone experience for Classics majors who wish to work on a special topic involving Latin language and literature. The course will be directed toward the completion of a paper on a subject chosen by the student and accepted by the faculty supervisor of the course. The course includes: a systematic introduction to the ways in which scholars of Latin language and literature develop topics; a critical evaluation of the relevant Latin texts and a selection of secondary literature; an introduction to methods of citing scholarship and constructing a bibliography; the construction of a paper outline; a critique of a first draft; a final paper.

LATN6001 Cicero

Reading of one or more of Cicero's rhetorical works, philosophical works, or speeches, typically about ten OCT pages a week. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with Cicero's writings in their historical, literary, and intellectual setting.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6002 Comedy

Reading of three plays by Plautus and Terence. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with Roman comedy as an adaptation of Greek new comedy to a Roman social setting. Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship. Attention will be paid to the meters of Roman comedy.

LATN6003 Tacitus

Reading of selections from Tacitus, typically about ten OCT pages a week.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with Tacitus' prose style and approach to writing history.  His writings will also be examined in their cultural, literary, and intellectual setting.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6004 Horace

Reading of selections from Horace's Odes and Satires. The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of Horace's poetry.  Topics to be examined include Horace's place in the tradition of the lyric genre and of Roman satire, his relationship with Augustus and the circle of Maecenas, the style and character of his poetry. Students will be expected to consult standard commentaries and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6005 The Novel

Reading of Petronius' Satyricon or Apuleius' Golden Ass.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the nature of the ancient novel and its Roman development.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6006 Lucretius

Reading of a substantial selection of Lucretius' De Rerum Natura.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the philosophical and poetic issues connected with the poem.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and to read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6007 Silver Latin

Reading of selections from such Silver Age authors as Juvenal, Seneca, Pliny, Lucan, Martial, and Statius.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with the texts read in their historical, literary, and intellectual setting.  Students are expected to read standard commentaries and some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN6008 Vergil, Eclogues and Georgics

Reading of Vergil's Eclogues and Georgics.  The course will involve relatively polished oral translations into English and discussion of the issues connected with Vergil's use of the pastoral and didactic genres in their literary and intellectual context.  Students are expected to consult standard commentaries and read some selection of secondary scholarship.

LATN7011 Prose Composition

This course advances knowledge of Latin prose through composition of complex sentences and paragraphs.  It also includes study of the historical development of prose style through analysis of exemplary passages from various authors.

LATN8001 Remedial

This course offers intermediate study to those students entering the graduate program who require additional preparation in Latin before undertaking graduate-level work.  It is designed to improve a student's knowledge of the Latin language and develop facility in translation, in preparation for entrance into 6000-level Latin courses.  This course does not count toward the graduate requirements in Latin.

LATN8005 Directed Readings

Directed readings offer a student the opportunity to engage in independent work in Latin, resulting in examination by a supervising faculty member.  Permission of the graduate advisor is required.

LATN9001 Seminar

The seminar prepares students to become research scholars in topics involving Latin language and literature.  It typically includes intensive reading of Latin texts from one author or genre or on a single subject, substantial reading in secondary sources, participation in discussion of ancient texts and modern interpretation of them, and development of oral reports and research papers.