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Headlines from Archaeology Magazine

  • Marble Sculptures Repatriated to Lebanon

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 16, 2017 | 00:05 P

    Marble Sculptures Repatriated to Lebanon NEW YORK, NEW YORK—CBS News reports that three ancient sculptures, including a marble torso dating to the sixth century B.C., a bull’s head dated to the fourth century B.C., and another torso dating to the fourth century B.C., have been repatriated to Lebanon. The artworks are thought to have been among more than 500 objects looted from the Temple of Eshmun, located in southwestern Lebanon, during a civil war in the 1970s. “These are actual celebrated remnants of an entire civilization’s culture and history,” said New York District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. The statues came to light when the bull’s[…]

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  • Bronze-Age Tomb Discovered Near Loch Ness

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 15, 2017 | 23:47 P

    Bronze-Age Tomb Discovered Near Loch Ness LOCH NESS, SCOTLAND—BBC News reports that a second Bronze-Age burial has been found on the western shore of Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. A single Beaker pot was found in the 4,000-year-old cist, which had filled with soil. The small pot, which has a flared neck and a simple, incised decoration, may have held an offering. Mary Peteranna of AOC Archaeology said historic maps show a large cairn once stood in the area, but centuries of plowing have damaged the remains of prehistoric structures. “During the work, we actually found a displaced capstone from another grave that either has[…]

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  • 19th-Century Grave of British Soldiers Found in New Zealand

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 15, 2017 | 23:30 P

    19th-Century Grave of British Soldiers Found in New Zealand NORTHLAND, NEW ZEALAND—According to a report in the New Zealand Herald, the remains of 12 British soldiers who died in the last battle of New Zealand’s Northern Wars have been found in a communal grave at the site of Ruapekapeka Pa. Also known as the “Bat’s Nest,” Ruapekapeka Pa was a Maori hilltop fortress complete with a palisade, trenches, and tunnels. Over several days in January 1846, more than 1,000 British troops bombarded the fortress and opened a breach in the palisade. They found only a few Maori warriors remaining within the fortress, but the fighting intensified and about a[…]

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  • Scientists Identify Intestinal Parasites in Ancient Greek Burials

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 15, 2017 | 22:42 P

    Scientists Identify Intestinal Parasites in Ancient Greek Burials CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND—Some 2,500 years ago, the Greek doctor Hippocrates described infestations of parasitic worms in his patients. Modern scholars suspected he was referring to roundworms, pinworms, and tapeworms, but had not been able to confirm the diagnoses. Live Science reports that biological anthropologist Evilena Anastasiou of the University of Cambridge led a team of researchers who analyzed soil adhering to the pelvic bones of 25 skeletons unearthed on the Greek island of Kea for traces of parasites in decomposed feces. They detected and identified roundworm and whipworm eggs in four of the burials, and noted that the eggs of those[…]

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  • 2,500-Year-Old Rock Art Discovered on Tiny Indonesian Island

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Dec 14, 2017 | 21:25 P

    2,500-Year-Old Rock Art Discovered on Tiny Indonesian Island CANBERRA, AUSTRALIA—The International Business Times reports that 2,500-year-old cave art depicting boats, dogs, horses, and people has been discovered on the small Indonesian island of Kisar. In some of the images, the people are holding what may be shields, while in other scenes, they are playing drums or perhaps performing ceremonies. The artwork is small in size, like the drawings found on the neighboring island of Timor, according to Sue O’Connor of Australia National University. The images also resemble those found on metal drums made in northern Vietnam and southwest China and traded throughout the region some 2,500 years ago.[…]

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