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AIA Cincinnati Archaeology Fair - October 18

Come to the 1st Annual AIA Cincinnati Archaeology Fair, October 18, 2014! In recognition of World Archaeology Day, your local AIA Society has organized a fun-filled day of hands-on activities for curious people of all ages! Events and activities will represent archaeological work in the midwest and much further afield. This event is free and open to the public and will be held at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center. 

Cincinnati Local Society

The Cincinnati Local Society of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) supports the AIA's central mission and is hosted by the Dept. of Classics at the University of Cincinnati. Founded in 1905, it is one of the oldest of the more than 100 local societies of the AIA in the U.S., Canada, Athens, and Iberia. AIA local societies are run by and for their own AIA members, giving individual members the satisfaction of being involved in the AIA on both the national and local level.

AIA headquarters sponsors national lectures annually for each society. But the heart of every AIA Society is its locally planned programs -- field trips, local tours, symposia, film festivals, and study groups -- as well as additional lectures organized by each society. Members of local societies enjoy a full program of activities throughout the year that serves to foster and enhance their interest in archaeology.


AIA Mission Statement

The Archaeological Institute of America promotes a vivid and informed public interest in the cultures and civilizations of the past, supports archaeological research, fosters the sound professional practice of archaeology, advocates the preservation of the world's archaeological heritage, and represents the discipline in the wider world.


Local AIA News

Next Lecture: Dr. Kara Cooney on Ancient Egypt

Dr. Kathlyn (Kara) Cooney, Weds. Oct. 22, 7:00 p.m. "The Woman Who Would be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt"<...

2014-15 AIA Cincinnati Lectures and Events

We have an exciting year of lectures planned for 2014-15, with a wide range of topics that are sure to ignite your passion…

National AIA News

AIA Cincinnati Archaeology Fair - October 18 PDF Print Email
Written by Susan Allen   
Tuesday, 24 June 2014 13:37
Come to the 1st Annual AIA Cincinnati Archaeology Fair, October 18, 2014! In recognition of World Archaeology Day, your local AIA Society has organized a fun-filled day of hands-on activities for curious people of all ages! Events and activities will represent archaeological work in the midwest and much further afield. This event is free and open to the public and will be held at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center. 
Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 June 2014 15:08
 
2014-15 AIA Cincinnati Lectures and Events PDF Print Email

We have an exciting year of lectures planned for 2014-15, with a wide range of topics that are sure to ignite your passion for archaeology! During the year, we may also sponsor other lecturers who not on the National AIA circuit. Updates to the schedule will be posted regularly on our website, so please check back often. We look forward to seeing you at the lectures, which are free and open to the public.

 

Lecture times, venues, and the full schedule:

Sat., Oct. 18, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Archaeology Fair at Clifton Cultural Arts Center, Clifton Avenue 

1st Annual Cincinnati AIA Archaeology Fair at CCAC

Family-friendly event -- free and open to the public:

In recognition of World Archaeology Day, we have orgnized a family-friendly event with dozens of hands-on activities for kids and grown-ups to engage with archaeology and the past here in Cincinnati and further afield. *More details coming soon!

This event is co-sponsored by the Archaeological Institute of America, the Cincinnati Society of the AIA, the University of Cincinnati Department of Classics and the University of Cincinnati Department of Anthropology.

*Parking is available behind the CCAC in the lot on McAlpin and on-street along McAlpin.

Weds. Oct. 22 at 7:00 PM at the Cincinnati Art Museum 

Dr. Kara Cooney, UCLA

"The Woman Who Would be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt"

Bucking the trend of the rarity of long-term powerful female rulers in the ancient world, Hatshepsut ascended to the throne at the young age of twenty and ruled as co-regent with Thutmosis III for more than two decades. How was she able to do this?  According to Dr. Cooney, "Hatshepsut had to shrewdly operate the levers of a patriarchal system to emerge as Egypt's second female pharaoh."

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Department of Classics. A reception will follow the lecture.

*Parking is available in the Museum lot (free for Museum and AIA members, fee for others). 

Spring Lecture 1 - Date and location TBA!

Dr. Bridget Buxton, Assistant Professor, University of Rhode Island

Underwater Archaeology: The New Holy Grails"

Spring Lecture 2 - Date and location TBA!

International lecturer sponsored by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation


Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 June 2014 15:05
 
AIA Mission Statement PDF Print Email

The Archaeological Institute of America promotes a vivid and informed public interest in the cultures and civilizations of the past, supports archaeological research, fosters the sound professional practice of archaeology, advocates the preservation of the world's archaeological heritage, and represents the discipline in the wider world.

 
Next Lecture: Dr. Kara Cooney on Ancient Egypt PDF Print Email

Dr. Kathlyn (Kara) Cooney, Weds. Oct. 22, 7:00 p.m. "The Woman Who Would be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt"

Dr. Cooney, Associate Professor of Egyptian Art and Archaeology at UCLA, will discuss her research on Hatshepsut, the female king of Egypt. 

The lecture will take place at the Cincinnati Art Museum. Parking is available in the Museum parking lot. A reception will follow the lecture. This lecture is jointly sponsored by the Cincinnati Society of the AIA and the UC Department of Classics. See below for an abstract of the lecture provided by Dr. Cooney.

Abstract: Almost no evidence of successful, long-term female leaders exists from the ancient world – in the Mediterranean, Near East, Africa, Central Asia, or East Asia. Cleopatra attempted to use her sexuality and money to build alliances with the Roman empire and keep its imperial exploitation at bay; Boudicca, a noble elite of Britain led her people against Roman legions; Fulvia raised legions against Roman competitors on behalf of her husband Marc Antony. All of them came to ruin, in the end. Wu Zeitan of China took power as empress and kept that power (but we should probably not even consider her ‘ancient,’ but rather ‘medieval’). Only the female king of Egypt, Hatshepsut, stands apart.

This lecture will focus on Hatshepsut, the daughter of a general who took Egypt's throne. Married to her brother, she was expected to bear the sons who would legitimize the reign of her father’s family. Her failure to produce a male heir was ultimately the twist of fate that paved the way for her inconceivable rule as a cross-dressing king.  At just twenty, Hatshepsut ascended to the rank of king in an elaborate coronation ceremony that set the tone for her spectacular twenty-two year reign as co-regent with Thutmose III, the infant king whose mother Hatshepsut out-maneuvered for a seat on the throne. Hatshepsut was a master strategist, cloaking her political power plays with the veil of piety and sexual expression. Just as women today face obstacles from a society that equates authority with masculinity, Hatshepsut had to shrewdly operate the levers of a patriarchal system to emerge as Egypt's second female pharaoh.

This lecture follows the unconventional life of an almost-forgotten pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power.

 
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