Thursday 17th of April 2014
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Cincinnati Local Society

The Cincinnati Local Society of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) supports the AIA's central mission and is hosted by the Dept. of Classics at the University of Cincinnati. Founded in 1905, it is one of the oldest of the more than 100 local societies of the AIA in the U.S., Canada, Athens, and Iberia. AIA local societies are run by and for their own AIA members, giving individual members the satisfaction of being involved in the AIA on both the national and local level.

AIA headquarters sponsors national lectures annually for each society. But the heart of every AIA Society is its locally planned programs -- field trips, local tours, symposia, film festivals, and study groups -- as well as additional lectures organized by each society. Members of local societies enjoy a full program of activities throughout the year that serves to foster and enhance their interest in archaeology.


AIA Mission Statement

The Archaeological Institute of America promotes a vivid and informed public interest in the cultures and civilizations of the past, supports archaeological research, fosters the sound professional practice of archaeology, advocates the preservation of the world's archaeological heritage, and represents the discipline in the wider world.


Local AIA News

Next Lecture: Dr. Andrew Moore on First Farmers

Dr. Andrew M.T. Moore, Thurs. Apr. 3, 6:00 p.m. "The First Farmers in Western Asia: Abu Hureyra on the Euphrates."

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2013-14 AIA Cincinnati Lectures

We have an exciting year of lectures planned for 2013-14, with a wide range of topics that are sure to ignite your…

National AIA News

2013-14 AIA Cincinnati Lectures PDF Print Email

We have an exciting year of lectures planned for 2013-14, with a wide range of topics that are sure to ignite your passion for archaeology! During the year, we may also sponsor other lecturers who not on the National AIA circuit. Updates to the schedule will be posted regularly on our website, so please check back often. We look forward to seeing you at the lectures, which are free and open to the public.

 

Lecture times, venues, and the full schedule:

Weds. Sept. 18, 5:30 p.m., Room 300 Braunstein, University of Cincinnati **NOTE VENUE CHANGE to 300 BRAUNSTEIN

Dr. Norman Yoffee - Professor Emeritus, Department of Near Eastern Studies & Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan

Dr. Yoffee will speak on "Early Cities and the Evolution of History," which he describes as follows:

"Although several recent books overview research on early cities, they do not attempt systematic comparisons. In a forthcoming volume, entitled “Early Cities and Comparative History,” such comparisons are emphasized. As editor of this volume, I present some of the results of the volume, including material from the introduction on the history of research of early cities and the conclusion on the meaning of early cities in the past and present (which are my own chapters)."

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Department of Classics and the Department of Anthropology. A reception will follow the lecture.

*Parking is available in Clifton Ct. Garage (fee), Stratford Heights Garage (fee), or on-street on Clifton Ave. and adjacent streets.

Tues. Oct. 8 at 7:00 PM at the Cincinnati Art Museum 

Dr. Sinclair Bell, Northern Illinois University

"Foreign Faces: Africans and Others in Ancient Roman Art"

How did ancient Romans understand other peoples, especially Africans? This talk surveys the evidence of Roman literature, inscriptions and especially works of art, including unpublished material from current excavations. Dr. Bell investigates the creative forms of artistic expression that Africans inspired across the empire, and suggests some possible motives for their creation. 

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Department of Classics. A reception will follow the lecture.

*Parking is available in the Museum lot (free for Museum and AIA members, fee for others). 

Mon., Feb. 3 at 7:00 PM at the Cincinnati Museum Center.

Dr. Irene Lemos, AIA Sameul Kress Lecturer and Professor at Oxford University

Dr. Lemos will discuss “Out of the Dark: Lefkandhi in Euboea after 1200 BCE," which she describes as follows:

The site of Lefkandi in Euboea has offered much to the archaeology of the Late Bronze and Iron Age Aegean. The amazing discoveries made by teams of British and Greek archaeologists at the site have changed our perspectives of the period from 1200 to 700 BCE. In the lecture, I will present a summary of the most important discoveries at the site, including those from the recent excavations under my direction.

The history of Lefkandi started in the Early Bronze Age when the settlement was occupied for the first time and the site became an important node in the Aegean during the Middle Bronze Age. During the Mycenaean period Lefkandi was under the control of the powerful palace of Thebes but after the collapse of the Mycenaean administration system, the site became one of the key and most important settlements in the Aegean if not of the eastern Mediterranean.

During the last stages of the Bronze Age and into the Iron Age the inhabitants exploited the beneficial location of the site in the Euboean Gulf and the natural resources of their region. Lefkandi developed into one of the most prosperous and affluent communities of its time. Was this an exceptional site whose wealth and complex social organisation was indeed unrivaled or is it because of the modern archaeological research that we can gain a glimpse of one of the less known periods in ancient Greece?

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Department of Classics and the Cincinnati Museum Center, as part of its "Insight" series of lectures. A reception will follow the lecture.

*Parking is available in the Museum Center lot (free for Museum members, fee for others). 

Tuesday, April 3 at 6:00 PM, 300 Braunstein Hall

Dr. Andrew M.T. Moore, AIA President and Professor at Rochester Institute of Technology

Dr. Moore will discuss "The First Farmers in Western Asia: Excavations at Abu Hureyra on the Euprates," which he desribes as follows:

The transition from hunting and gathering to farming was the most important transformation that has taken place in the entire human career.  It marked a major step away from a two million year old way of life of foraging for wild plants and consumption of game to a new form of existence based on domesticated species.  These first farmers usually inhabited settled villages.  In time, farming led to population growth, more complex societies, and our modern world.

This change first occurred in Western Asia.  Much of the process can be seen at the ancient settlement of Abu Hureyra in the Euphrates River Valley.  In excavations I conducted there in the 1970s we documented the adoption of farming by the inhabitants 13,000 years ago and the subsequent growth of the settlement that followed.  Abu Hureyra is the oldest settlement at which the inception of farming had been demonstrated, and it became one of the largest early villages known across the region.

In this lecture I shall describe the excavation and its results.  I shall also discuss current research, much of it conducted by a new generation of scholars, on the material we recovered, especially the plant, animal and human remains.  This is providing new insights on the development of farming at Abu Hureyra.    It also demonstrates the power of new scientific research techniques.

One of the unexpected results of our current research is that farming began following a cosmic airburst over the northern hemisphere that drastically altered the climate towards the end of the last Ice Age.  This extraordinary event had a direct impact on the Abu Hureyra settlement.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Department of Classics and the Department of Anthropology. A reception will follow the lecture.

*Parking is available in Clifton Ct. Garage (fee), Stratford Heights Garage (fee), or on-street on Clifton Ave. and adjacent streets.


Last Updated on Friday, 07 March 2014 10:42
 
Next Lecture: Dr. Andrew Moore on First Farmers PDF Print Email
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 16 August 2013 08:18

Dr. Andrew M.T. Moore, Thurs. Apr. 3, 6:00 p.m. "The First Farmers in Western Asia: Abu Hureyra on the Euphrates."

Dr. Moore, AIA President and Professor at Rochester Institute of Technology, will discuss important findings from the site of Abu Hureyra, Syria, which spans the transition from foraging to farming and preserves the earliest evidence for agriculture in the Near East. Dr. Moore's lecture focuses on discussion of the site's rapid growth over the course of this transition and recent results of analysis on the plant, animal, and human remains from the site and their implications for the broader long-term effects of farming. 

The lecture will take place in 300 Braunstein Hall. Nearby parking is available on-street on Clifton Avenue and in the garage at Clifton Court (fee). 

This lecture is jointly sponsored by the Cincinnati Society of the AIA, the UC Department of Anthropology, and the UC Department of Classics.


Last Updated on Friday, 07 March 2014 10:51
 
AIA Mission Statement PDF Print Email

The Archaeological Institute of America promotes a vivid and informed public interest in the cultures and civilizations of the past, supports archaeological research, fosters the sound professional practice of archaeology, advocates the preservation of the world's archaeological heritage, and represents the discipline in the wider world.

 
Local Society Award Winners at the 114th AIA Meeting, Jan. 2013 PDF Print Email

The Cincinnati AIA Society warmly congratulates our award-winning Society President, Ann Santen, the recipient of the Martha and Artemis Joukowsky Distinguished Service Award at the 115th Annual Meeting of the AIA in January, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois! We are very proud of Ann's accomplishment and grateful for her tireless efforts in support of making archaeology accessible to a broad audience!

Read about Ann's award here on the main AIA website:

http://www.archaeological.org/awards/joukowsky

As in previous years, many active archaeologists from the University of Cincinnati shared the results of their research and contributed to the overall governance and operation of the AIA through their participation in committees, governing boards, and interest groups. 

The Cincinnati AIA Society congratulates previous award-winning participants!

2012 James R. Wiseman Book Award: Dr. Kathleen Lynch, UC Classics 

For, The Symposium in Context: Pottery from a Late Archaic House in the Athenian Agora. This is a highly coveted award and a fantastic achievement for Dr. Lynch. You can read an interview with her about her work here:

http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/news/newsDetails/symposium-in-context-wins-2013-wiseman-award

2012 Graduate Student Paper Award: Allison Emmerson (UC Classics, Ph.D. candidate)

Click here for more information on the meeting.

 
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